Just returned from a snowy weekend in New Jersey, with side trips to Philadelphia and (drum roll, please) Wilmington, Delaware? Why the drum roll? Because I now have the data in hand to complete Groceteria’s 50th state, which I promised to do by the site’s 20th anniversary this summer. That’s coming soon, but for now, here are some recent additions and updates:

The store above is a still-standing Food Fair on Brunswick Avenue in Trenton NJ. There’s another one that’s even better here.

Also, I’ll be visiting the Allen County Public Library in Fort Wayne next month and will be filling in a lot of holes using their massive collection of print city directories from around the country. That trip will also take me to Detroit, Toledo, and possibly Lansing and Milwaukee. More soon.

Only three more states and I will have every US state and Canadian province covered on the site. I’m already working on the final three, which will be:

  • Delaware (Wilmington): I may be traveling there to do a full list in the next few months.
  • Louisiana (New Orleans): Only through 1959 for now. I will have to visit in person to do the rest.
  • Mississippi (Jackson): Same as New Orleans.

Recent additions (in no particular order):

 

Read it here: Krogering in Greensboro.

As a companion to my recent feature on the history of local A&P branches, I have just added a new photo essay detailing the story behind every Kroger location in my hometown of Greensboro, North Carolina, from the first in 1952 to the mass exodus in 1999.

The march toward having all fifty states and ten provinces represented here is nearing its goal. In fact, all the Canadian provinces are already represented as of a few weeks ago. Thanks to Andrew Turnbull for many recent contributions, and also to reader BM10K.

Additions since the last update, more or less in chronological order:

Of course, you could know about these much earlier via Twitter and you could also see road photos, like the ones from my recent trip to Ontario. Much more to come. Here’s what’s in the queue.

Also, I’ve been plugging away at tagging my photo backlog, so look for a lot (like, hundreds) of new photos in a few week.

And now back to not watching the election returns so I’ll actually be able to sleep tonight…

Latest additions (more or less chronologically):

Lots of new additions, including the research I did during my recent trip to Atlantic Canada:

Look for photos and some additional info on these soon.

And back in the USA, a set of new additions, mostly thanks to Andrew Turnbull:

Moving toward the goal, there are now 37 of the 50 US states represented on the map, as well as 8 of the 10 Canadian provinces (but none of the territories).

The map is really filling in. Between online resources and a fair amount of travel, not to mention some generous assistance from a guest explorer, there are now thirty states and five provinces represented on the site. The most recent additions are as follows:

And there are a number of cities large and small, American and Canadian, in the queue, including expanded lists for Boston and Toronto, more Metro Cincinnati, Richmond and Petersburg, and more.

In fact, I have decided to set a goal of having at least one city in every state completed within the next year. That said, Alaska might be tricky as there are no real data sources online that I have found. But I’ll try! If anyone wants to help, have a look at my methodology page. It would be great to have locals (who would have access to full runs of city directories in their libraries) pitching in. And maybe I’ll waste time creating some kind of status graphic. Or not…

Over a period of 78 years, from 1909 to 1987, a total of 42 A&P-owned stores opened (and closed) in Greensboro, North Carolina. Of those, 24 are still standing as of 2018. This article series will trace the history of all 42 locations and include photos from the 24 remaining buildings.

Northern and Orman Avenues, Pueblo, Colorado.

As far as I can tell, the top right structure was the original early-1950s “pylon” Safeway. Sometime around 1965-1966, the footprint was dramatically enlarged to create a Safeway/Super S combo. The “scalloped” roof (lower right) was added to the old Safeway to create the Super S drug store and a new Marina-style Safeway was built to the left. The whole shebang closed in the mid-1980s.

The latest updates:

There will probably be more, as this is a holiday weekend in the US and I have no life.

By the way, if you’re interested in contributing content, please see my methodology page. There’s even a handy spreadsheet template.

All the cool kids are doing it.

OK, only a couple of the cool kids are doing it. But that could change…