This is a list of all known chain grocery addresses in Little Rock and North Little Rock between 1925 and 2021, compiled from city directories, telephone books, and other sources. It is generated through a live Google Spreadsheet so it reflects the latest information I have.

Access and download the location spreadsheet via Google Sheets.

Notes:

  • Kroger apparently entered Little Rock through the purchase of Cox Cash Stores. They also did several swaps with Black & White Stores.
  • Safeway owned Little Rock’s Piggly Wiggly stores by at least 1930. Some stores were listed as “Safeway” in 1935 but may actually have operated as Piggly Wiggly stores.
  • Model Markets was a franchise/co-op. Black & White may have been as well.
  • National Tea was in and out in less than a decade.
  • Harvest Foods was the name given to Safeway stores when they were purchased ca. 1987 as part of Safeway’s exit from the market. Based on the directory information, there is some question about whether some stores may have closed for a time between owners. Harvest went bankrupt in 1995 and things got confusing after that with stores being listed under multiple banners (Harvest, City Market, and Food Giant). Edwards Food Giant seems to be the survivor of that lineage today.
  • Kroger ended up purchasing several Harvest locations and now operates at least one stores that was probably built as a Safeway and another than started as Skaggs-Albertsons (later Skaggs-Alpha Beta).

Store tags:

  • Black & White
  • Cox Cash Stores
  • Harvest Foods/City Market/Edwards Food Giant
  • IGA
  • Kroger
  • Model Markets
  • National
  • Piggly Wiggly
  • Safeway
  • Weingarten

This is a list of all known chain grocery addresses in Rock Island and Moline (including East Moline, Milan, and Silvis) between 1925 and 2021, compiled from city directories, telephone books, and other sources. It is generated through a live Google Spreadsheet so it reflects the latest information I have.

See the page for Davenport and Bettendorf, Iowa.

Access and download the location spreadsheet via Google Sheets.

Store tags:

  • A&P
  • Eagle
  • Geifman’s
  • Hy-Vee
  • Jewel
  • Kroger
  • National
  • Randall’s
  • Super Valu
  • Tri-City

Read it here: Krogering in Greensboro.

As a companion to my recent feature on the history of local A&P branches, I have just added a new photo essay detailing the story behind every Kroger location in my hometown of Greensboro, North Carolina, from the first in 1952 to the mass exodus in 1999.

The Kroger location at 700 Spinning Road near Dayton, Ohio, apparently opened in 1967 as part of a small shopping center. Sometime in the 1980s, it was remodeled into a smaller adaptation of the “Greenhouse” style stores Kroger was opening throughout the chain. This decor package featured curving walls and super-graphics using the Bauhaus font. In most stores. The signage colors varied by department, but this is not the case in the Dayton store,. Based on the colors currently used, I suspect the signs may have been repainted during the “Grid” decor years of the 1990s. Otherwise, it is a pretty faithful abbreviated version of the “Greenhouse” model, and it still seems to be doing a pretty brisk business.

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You rarely find a former centennial A&P like this with its pole sign largely intact. This store is in the 1200 block of Pittsburgh Street in Cheswick PA. The whole surrounding shopping center is a little odd, as it contains a two-story building that looks like it may have housed a skating rink or a bowling alley upstairs. Underneath is a block of stores, one of which is currently a Goodwill, but feels very Kroger-like inside.

More photos after the jump.

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This one’s an interesting specimen. It obviously dates from the late 1950s or early 1960s, and was given some sort of “superstore” retrofit in the 1970s. But the original sign stayed, and then the whole building was eventually painted a nice, bland beige. The interior is the slightly cheesy teal “millenium” package that every Kroger in West Virginia seems to have. I think the layout has been altered from the original as well.

It amazes me how many of these smaller and older stores are still operating in parts of West Virginia and Ohio. I’m travelling I-77, I-79, and US 19 a lot these days, since I’m sort of living in Pittsburgh part time now, and I’m seeing a lot of these as I try to vary my commutes between Winston-Salem and da ‘Burgh. I may be posting a few more examples this week.

So is this cool or what? It’s an obvious Kroger — of this prototype, which is fast becoming one of my favorites — and it was shot in Wichita in 2005 by Terry, a Groceteria reader from Oklahoma City who’s provided me with tons of cool stuff lately.

The store obviously became a Dillon’s at some point, although I don’t know whether it was before or during the 1983 merger of the two chains. It’s really cool, though, to see that it survived for so long. As far as I can tell, it’s the location at 1640 South Broadway Street, and it’s apparently still open.